BBC Children in Need awards Funding to Wrexham’s Nightingale House Hospice

BBC Children in Need has awarded grant money to Wrexham’s Nightingale House Hospice through the Nightingale House Hospice charity’s Main Grants Programme.

The new funding will enable the project to provide services to young people in the area and means that the charity now has more than £863,000 invested locally.

This is the first funding allocation of the year, with additional funding to be allocated to projects across the UK throughout 2019.

Nightingale House Hospice will use the three-year grant of £120,000 to deliver services and support for bereaved children and young people. Through the program of dedicated support the project aims to ensure the children and young people to feel supported in their grief whilst increasing their emotional well being for the future.

Grants and Trusts Fundraiser at Nightingale House Hospice, Christine Dukes said, “The Release Bereavement project will support young people at two very difficult times in their lives – pre-bereavement and post-bereavement. Support will come in the form of one-to-one sessions, a telephone help line and group sessions as they become more comfortable with the service and the surroundings, thus enabling them to benefit from being with other young people facing similar issues.”

Dukes further said, “In addition, our arts and crafts and music therapy programmes will offer another way for the young people to come to terms with their loss. Our early experience with this form of therapy has shown remarkable results in the way children interact and develop coping and life strategies. Memory books, storytelling and art therapy all play their part in supporting the young person to manage their grief, and feel supported in it. A big thank you to everyone at BBC Children in Need.”

National Head of Wales at BBC Children in Need said, Jemma Wray said, “It is always so rewarding to be able to put the public’s donations to work across Wales. I’m delighted that we are able to offer funding to such impactful projects to support children and young people, and am very much looking forward to seeing the difference this funding makes to young lives.”

Wray also said, “As a grant maker, we are always looking to meet new, impactful projects and so we are calling on organisations working with disadvantaged children and young people in the area to get in touch to discuss project proposals which will go on to make a difference to young lives.”

BBC Children in Need’s Chief Executive, Simon Antrobus added, “As always, thanks must go to our generous supporters and fundraisers – we are only able to make these much needed awards because of them. Each project will go on to make a positive impact on the lives of disadvantaged children and young people in communities across the UK who really do need our help, so thank you for making these grants possible.”

BBC Children in Need is currently funding 11 projects to a value of £863,000 million. BBC Children in Need awards grants at six points during the year and funds two types of grants, both of which are open to new or existing applicants.

A Main Grants Programme is for grants over £10,000 per year to support projects for up to three years. Meanwhile, our Small Grants Programme supports projects for up to three years, and includes grants up to and including £10,000 per year. Both of these programs are currently open to applications.

BBC Children in Need relies on the generosity and creativity of the thousands of supporters and fundraisers who raise millions of pounds for the charity every year. To date the UK public has raised more than £1 billion for children and young people facing disadvantage across the UK.

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